Around the web 7/13/2013 — No response on salt magma hypothesis, nature deficit disorder, thou shalt not criticize Ken Ham, and more

It has been a while time since my last "Around the web" post, and I have bookmarked more articles than I can reasonably make brief comments on. Here are a few... THE DEATH OF GOOGLE READER -- Since the untimely demise of Google Reader a couple weeks ago, I haven't been keeping up on the …

Continue reading Around the web 7/13/2013 — No response on salt magma hypothesis, nature deficit disorder, thou shalt not criticize Ken Ham, and more

Around the web 12/1/2012

NUKE THE MOON!!!! -- U.S. had plans to nuke the moon -- The U.S. Government really wanted to explode a nuclear weapon on the moon in the late 1950s, sort of as a macho "We're better than the Soviets" thing. One of the researchers on this project was a graduate student named Carl Sagan. BIG NEWS …

Continue reading Around the web 12/1/2012

Tharsis Tholus from Mars Express

From the European Space Agency: Battered Tharsis Tholus volcano on Mars The latest image released from Mars Express reveals a large extinct volcano that has been battered and deformed over the aeons. By Earthly standards, Tharsis Tholus is a giant, towering 8 km above the surrounding terrain, with a base stretching over 155 x 125 …

Continue reading Tharsis Tholus from Mars Express

Mars dust devil trails

Today's Astronomy Picture of the Day: Martian Dust Devil Trails The APOD description for this image: Who's been marking up Mars? This portion of a recent high-resolution picture from the HiRISE camera on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows twisting dark trails criss-crossing light colored terrain on the martian surface. Newly formed trails like these …

Continue reading Mars dust devil trails

A cheaper way to get humans to Mars: One-way tickets

NASA's Astrobiology Magazine has the text of a presentation given by physicist Paul Davies: A One-way Ticket to Mars. The greatest expense in sending a group of astronauts to Mars is actually getting them back to Earth. Davies estimates that we may be able to save up to 80% of the costs by sending a …

Continue reading A cheaper way to get humans to Mars: One-way tickets

Martian methane

From LiveScience.com: Mars Methane: Geology or Biology? Plumes of methane gas detected over certain locations on Mars in 2003 could point to active geological processes on the red planet, or perhaps even to methane-burping microbes deep below the Martian surface, a new study reports. There is no firm evidence for life on the red planet, …

Continue reading Martian methane

Mars climate change recorded in rocks

Patterns in sedimentary layers on Mars could be the result of cyclical climate change caused by regular variations in the tilt of the planet's axis: Climate on Earth is controlled by similar cyclical changes in the Earth's orbit and axial tilt, which leads to alternating glacial and interglacial periods. LiveScience article: Mars Wobbles Created Climate …

Continue reading Mars climate change recorded in rocks

Glaciers on Mars, part 2

Today's Astronomy Picture of the Day: Radar Indicates Buried Glaciers on Mars. Explanation: What created this unusual terrain on Mars? The floors of several mid-latitude craters in Hellas Basin on Mars appear unusually grooved, flat, and shallow. New radar images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter bolster an exciting hypothesis: huge glaciers of buried ice. Evidence …

Continue reading Glaciers on Mars, part 2