The GeoChristian

The Earth. Christianity. They go together.

The books that have most influenced me

Here are my “top 10” books that have had an impact on my life. Some of them have impacted millions of other people; a few may not be on the “top 10” list of anyone else on the planet.

I would put the Bible as the #1 book, but it needs to be on its own list. None of the following books would even be in the same category in terms of their influence in my life.

  • Knowing God, by J.I. Packer — This was the first major Christian book I read, back when I was twenty years old. It laid an excellent foundation for my life and doctrine. A lot Christian books are fluffy or ephemeral; this one will still be read centuries from now (if the Lord’s return is delayed that long).
  • Mere Christianity, by C.S. Lewis — Another 20th century author whose works will still be read a few hundred years from now. Lewis’s work helped to solidify my faith as a college student.
  • Operation World, by Patrick Johnstone (new edition is by Jason Mandryk) — This is subtitled “The Definitive Prayer Guide to Every Nation.” This book helped to establish a lifelong desire to pray and work for the day when people “from every tribe and language and people and nation” (Rev 5:9 NIV) would stand before the throne of Christ.
  • The Pursuit of God, by A.W. Tozer — “The man who has God for his treasure has all things in One.” I received this as a graduation present from Grace Bible Church in Bozeman, Montana.
  • The Cost of Discipleship, by Dietrich Bonhoeffer — Bonhoeffer, martyred by the Nazis, offers the most Christ-centered theology of life and discipleship I have read.
  • Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger, by Ronald Sider — The title is a good description of the book. Not all would agree with Sider’s policy solutions (some would say too liberal or even socialist), but the heart of the book—an overview of poverty in today’s world and in the Bible —is solid. This book opened my eyes and heart to the deep poverty that much of the world lives in.
  • In Six Days, by Charles McGowen — I read this short presentation of young-Earth creationism when I was in tenth grade in high school, and was thoroughly convinced. Now I can see that just about everything in the book was utterly, totally, completely wrong, but it did get me started down the path that led to me majoring in geology and writing this blog.
  • Earth, by Frank Press and Raymond Siever — A university textbook on my “most influential textbooks” list? When I was a college Freshman, a friend was majoring in geology, and he had this book. I paged through it in his room, and changed my major to geology (though not right away like I should have).
  • Evolution: Nature and Scripture in Conflict? by Pattle Pun — I was still a young-Earth creationist when I started studying geology as an undergraduate. This book, from an old-Earth Christian perspective,  may have helped prevent me from having a crisis of faith when I saw that most of what I had read in YEC literature quite simply did not work as an explanation for the geological record.
  • Pollution and the Death of Man, by Francis Schaeffer — To care about the Earth is not something we should do in addition to Christian discipleship; it is part of Christian discipleship. Schaeffer is still very popular among conservative Evangelicals, but most of them, unfortunately, have not read or taken to heart this work.

I would like to add a few honorable mentions:

  • Perspectives on the World Christian Movement, by Ralph Winter (ed.) — Why do we do missions? How do we do missions? Etc.
  • Evidence that Demands a Verdict, by Josh McDowell — Some parts of it are better than others, but it certainly had a strong influence on me in my college days. Today I would recommend The Reason for God by Timothy Keller instead.
  • A Survey of Bible Doctrine, by Charles Ryrie — Not quite my theology on some points any more, but still a good introduction. Today I would recommend Wayne Grudem’s Systematic Theology.
  • For the Beauty of the Earth, by Stephen Prediger-Bouma — Much more comprehensive than Schaeffer’s Pollution and the Death of Man.
  • Life Together, by Dietrich Bonhoeffer — The best book on having fellowship in Christian community.
  • The Silence of Adam, by Larry Crabb — Christ-centered perspective on being a man. Realism rather than triumphalism.

Pick one and read it!

Grace and Peace


For the opposite end of the spectrum, here are a few dishonorable mentions. These are books that were highly recommended to me, and I just couldn’t force myself to complete them:

  • Revival Lectures, by Charles Finney — Sin, sin, and more sin. Repent of everything before you can come to Christ. Sin no more if you want to stay in Christ. Spiritual perfectionism. About a third of the way into the book I started to ask myself, “Once I do everything Finney wants me to do, what do I need Jesus for?” This is Christ-less Christianity. To Finney, Christ is an example, but not a sin-bearer.
  • The Bondage Breaker, by Neil Anderson — A demon behind every problem. Extraordinarily speculative. But the solution is Jesus, not finding and casting out demons.

On the same note, a life goal of mine is to never read any of the Left Behind series or The Prayer of Jabez.

October 27, 2010 - Posted by | Apologetics, Christianity, Environment, Geology, Old-Earth creationism, Young-Earth creationism | , , , , , , , , ,

7 Comments »

  1. Geo: Although I am still debating creation (though leaning toward the traditional side) and have a geologist wife (old-earther), I really enjoy your blog.

    Like

    Comment by phw | October 27, 2010

  2. phw: Thanks.

    Like

    Comment by geochristian | October 27, 2010

  3. Any non-christian books? I only see one.

    Like

    Comment by Boz | October 27, 2010

  4. Boz:

    Do you have any Christian books that have profoundly influenced you?

    I could list some books by non-Christian authors that have informed me about the world (e.g. books by S.J. Gould, E.O. Wilson, Aldo Leopold, many others) but none of these have cut to the soul like Christian books have.

    Like

    Comment by geochristian | October 27, 2010

  5. Of course, “Earth” by Press and Siever, which I had in college, has been subsumed into “Understanding Earth” by Grotzinger, Jordan, Press, and Siever. “Understanding Earth” is a great book too – a lot of new discoveries have been made in Geology since the last edition of “Earth,” and the color photos and graphics in the latter make the principles much easier to understand than my old copy of “Earth” from the ’70s. Book prices sure have skyrocketed, though.

    Like

    Comment by Tim Helble | October 28, 2010

  6. “The primary objective of The GeoChristian is to increase science literacy among Evangelical Christians, especially in the areas of the Earth and environmental sciences.”

    If that’s really your objective, you should recommend “Why Evolution is True” by Jerry Coyne, and read it yourself.

    A person can’t call himself scientifically literate unless he completely understands how evolution works, and at least some of the evidence for it, whether or not that person accepts the evidence.

    darwin-killed-god dot blogspot dot com

    Like

    Comment by Human Ape | October 28, 2010

  7. Human Ape:

    I have not read Why Evolution is True; too many books, not enough time. I have a pretty good understanding of biological evolution, through minoring in biology, taking upper-division and graduate geology courses in invertebrate paleontology, vertebrate paleontology, and paleoecology; and through reading books (Gould, Conway Morris, several secular books on the the origin of life, etc.).

    It is not that I don’t have a good understanding of evolution. None of the books I have read, though interesting, have had a “top ten” impact on my life.

    Thanks for your comment.

    Like

    Comment by geochristian | October 28, 2010


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: