The GeoChristian

The Earth. Christianity. They go together.

New GIS class

I started a new GIS (Geographic Information Systems) class from ESRI today: Learning ArcGIS Spatial Analyst. I am taking courses like this to expand and update my GIS skills. Plus, it is cool stuff to work with.

I’ve done some of this before, such as generating shaded relief and contours:

Shaded relief and contour maps of Mt. Shasta, California. Note the lava flows on the lower slopes north of the main part of the volcano. Taken from the ESRI course Learning ArcGIS Spatial Analyst.

Shaded relief and contour maps of Mt. Shasta, California. Note the lava flows on the lower slopes north of the main part of the volcano. Taken from the ESRI course Learning ArcGIS Spatial Analyst.

Other things will be new to me, such as interpolating data. An example of this would be filling in precipitation values between scattered weather stations.

I might not get much blogging done this week, as I’d like to really push myself to get this done.

Grace and Peace


Update

Here’s my first hillshade map for this class. This is a hilly region near Harlan, Kentucky, showing the topography with the sun at an elevation of 45 degrees in the northwest:

spatialanalysthillshade

Here is a slope percent map of the same area. Green areas are flat, red areas are steep, and yellow areas are of intermediate slope:

spatialanalystslope

Here’s one more for tonight. This map shows slope aspect, which is the direction the slope faces:

spatialanalystaspect1

spatialanalystaspectkey

You could combine the final two maps to search for a homesite on a shady north-facing slope; not too steep, and not in the flats.

All of this illustrates one of the strengths of GIS: the ability to quickly analyze a large geospatial dataset—in this case a digital elevation model—to create new output files.

January 31, 2009 - Posted by | Employment, Maps

1 Comment »

  1. I didn’t know you were familiar with ESRI’s ArcGIS stuff. My operating unit works with a lot of geospatial issues, though we do mostly programming of tools for ESRI software. If you’re familiar with programming, it might be worth your while to check out Northrop Grumman. My office is out in the DC/Northern Virginia area, and I don’t know that we have many/any positions open, but something could turn up.

    Contact me at jwebmonk@gmail.com if you want something submitted at the NG jobs site. (it’s not exactly simple to use)

    Like

    Comment by WebMonk | February 2, 2009


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