Google Earth & microclimate

Google Earth came in handy today for illustrating microclimate. At lower elevations in the Bridger Range near Bozeman, Montana, dense pine forests form on north-facing slopes, whereas grass dominates the south-facing slopes. There is enough of a difference in soil temperature and moisture between the two sides of the ridges to make a significant difference in the microclimate, and hence the vegetation.


Earth science is a very visual topic—I use PowerPoint with lots of images, maps, and graphs—and Google Earth provides an additional tool for classroom and laboratory use.

Grace and Peace

4 thoughts on “Google Earth & microclimate

  1. tcutonilli

    I use Google Earth as well in my Earth Science class. It is now become my essential tool when describing landscapes and to show where volcanoes and earthquakes occur. The layers that can be added are great, but I have no idea how to create one myself.


  2. edl1680

    What people have described using Google Earth is so neat. I would imagine it helps turn the students on with regards to earth science. Does anyone know of a site to use with students on how to use Google Earth so the students can incorporate it into their projects? Thanks in advance for any assistance you can give me.


  3. tcutonilli

    I do not know of a site that can “teach” how to use Google Earth, but it is not difficult to learn – it is very logical in its navigation. Within a few minutes of trial and error, you can experience how to navigate around the Earth and add “layers” of interest from the sidebar.

    What also makes it powerful is its integration – you can navigate to a particular site or city and external links are provided (in addition to to the information provided within Google Earth).


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: Logo

You are commenting using your account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s